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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 70 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Aug 21, 2013 8:00pm EDT
of several historical novels he spoke for a little more than an hour in jackson, mississippi. >> the reason for me to be in jackson maybe more so than any other is what took place 40 miles west of here and that is what i want to talk about tonight. at vicksburg, so this is quite a story and even some people around here don't know it. that is great fun for me but i need to start out talking about something that i always mention whenever i'm doing any event like this. i am quite sure that at least some of you have some interest in the civil war for one reason, because at of some time many years ago perhaps you read a book called the killer angels. every time i say that i see people nod their heads. you have no idea what the killer angels is that's okay. it's not required. i'll explain it to you quickly. the killer angels was written by my father and came out in 1974. it is the story of the battle of gettysburg. now with the killer angels is not is the history of the battle of gettysburg. it's not a history book. it's the story as told to you from the characters themselves and not just any cha
KOFY
Aug 16, 2013 9:00pm PDT
to coach under saints boss peyton. breeze 1 mississippi 2 mississippi 3 mississippi 4 mississippi. got all day to find a receiver and hit stills. 14 of 18 for 202 yards. 17 nothing saints. buck 24 on the money due to moore. raiders down at the half. then defense comes through. quarterback wallace hit hard by 7 round pick bass. robinson for the scoop and score but raiders fall in new orleans 28-20. cal football team open up the season in just two week against northwestern. have a true freshman taking the snap head coach dikes has named goff the starting quarterback today. 4 star recruit out of may run catholic high school. big guy. 6 foot 4 very consistent. he can thank his dad jerry for the strong am. major league pitcher never pressured his son. >> s when i was younger i raised me to play the fwaip. talk to him before the game he said have fun. i try to do. have if you please do my job and play football. >>reporter: a open up a weekend series with cleveland tonight. chance to gain some ground on first place texas because the rangers lost early this evening to seattle. thi
CSPAN
Aug 24, 2013 12:30pm EDT
said we cannot rest and be satisfied as long as black folk in mississippi could not vote. and those in new york believed that they had nothing for which to vote. today the united states supreme court, having recently eviscerating the voting rights act and with numerous states clamoring to legislatively codify voting suppression measures, not only must we not be satisfied but we must fight back boldly. too many of our unknown heroes and she ros fought, bled and died for us to have the precious rights of vote. for us to now sit back and timidly allow our franchise to be taken away or diminished, we must not rest until the congress of the united states restores the voting rights act protections discard bid a supreme court blind to the blatant tests of the black folks. paramount to martin luther king jr.'s fervent dream was the commitment that african americans gain full economic opportunity and not be confined to basic mobility forward from a smaller ghetto to a larger one. today, with 12% unemployment rates in the african american community and 38% of all children of color in this cou
MSNBC
Aug 23, 2013 3:00pm PDT
trying to change b this country. he was the naacp's first field secretary in mississippi. he had fought for his country in world war ii. before coming home to fight for justice here. his assassination by a white supremacist in june of 1963 helped to inspire the march on washington. joining me now is myrlie evers williams, the widow of medgar evers and a legendary civil rights leader in her own right. and historian taylor branch author of the trilogy of books on dr. king and the civil rights movement. thank you both for being on tonight. >> it's a pleasure. >> thank you. >> let me start with you ms. evers williams. your husband was killed in june of '63, and it was part of what really ignited the movement that had already started around having this march. you were the speaker at that march and didn't make it. and one of the things we're most proud of is tomorrow you're going to make that speech at lincoln memorial for the march on washington. >> well, thank you. >> 50 years later. >> thank you ever so much. >> tell us what was running through your mind as you fought in mississippi and th
MSNBC
Aug 28, 2013 9:00am PDT
. the sad thing when i was in the georgia legislature we used to say thank god for mississippi because mississippi was always worse than georgia. now we have to say thank god for north carolina because north carolina has become the new mississippi. >> you know, brian, let's talk about north carolina. north carolina up until recently was seen as a sort of a bastion of progressism of the south. yet north carolina now is not exactly a bastion of anything progressive. >> no. i think that's right. one of the scary things for people who are committed to civil rights in this country is that the pace of which we have retreated from basic protections. what i'm most concerned about is these legislatures a lot of them in the south and other parts of the country actually take pride in their resistance to responding to the challenges that face people of color, that face the poor, that face the disadvantaged. they are proud of the fact that they are creating barriers to voting. in north carolina there was something called the racial justice act that was design to deal with the horrific disparities w
CSPAN
Aug 27, 2013 9:00pm EDT
i. once we got past 63 and 64 in saint augustine when the mob turned on the press and in mississippi when people like all good got fired by abc because he would not cover -- abc was still running the story, forgive me, that these three civil rights workers were hiding to get attention and he knew that they had been killed. he lost his job over that. i had to pull nelson at and out of a mob in saint augustine to keep them from being enough. a danish reporter got hit in the camera either by a baseball at and knocked his eye socket out. it was ruthless and brutal for the press. press.s the national the written press never quite believed what they saw. to have press conferences at 9:00 in the morning to say what we were going to do and then the demonstrations would start around 1030 and that 1:00, we would tell them what we did, why we did it, and we would answer questions but they would still -- they could not believe that martin luther king was as , as much of aent selfless man that he actually was. >> in 1961, may 20, when we arrived in montgomery during the freedom ride at the greyho
SFGTV2
Aug 3, 2013 3:30am PDT
in 1900. it is actually the oldest merit system west of the mississippi and it was essentially created in response to mass fraud and corruption in city government. so, to give you a perspective. the commission's mission is to establish, ensure, maintain equitable and credible merit system for public service employment. the commission's goal is to consistently provide the best qualified candidates for public service in a timely and cost-effective manner. and i'd also like to point out our equal employment policy which permeates through all of our rules, it is the goal to provide fair treatment of applicants and aspects of employment without regard to membership of protected category and [speaker not understood]. that's essentially what merit system means. the civil service commission is a five-member commission poby and approved with veto authority by the board of supervisors. it is an independent commission by chart of the mayor prohibited from intervening in the civil service commission's matters. the civil service commission department staff itself, we are a small staff of six indivi
ABC
Aug 5, 2013 4:30am PDT
failed over the weekend in mississippi. investigator say the instruttor and a student were dumping with five other skydivers and the equipment failed and they crashed in a swamp. the instruttor was killed but the student survived with multiple broken bones. >> rodriguez could play against the white sox even if major league baseball has other plans. later today the league is expected to suspend a-rod for the rest of the season over accusations that the third baseman used performance-enhancing drugs which the suspension could top 200 games and keep him off the field into the 2015 season. however, a-rod could still be allowed to play while he fights the suspension. >> there were no steroids. no one can do what he did. i thought you were innocent until proven guilty. until you have concrete evidence... >> 13 other players are expected to be suspended with him for links to a clinic accused of distributing performance-enhancing drugs. >> fast food workers are demanding better pay and the right to unionize. some workers who hold down two fast food jobs say they still not earning enough to
MSNBC
Aug 24, 2013 9:00am PDT
in mississippi could not vote and those in new york believed that they had nothing for which to vote. today the united states supreme court having recently eviscerating the voting rights act and with numerous states clamoring to legislative codify voting suppression measures, not only must we not be satisfied, but we must fight back boldly. too many of our unknown heroes and sheroes fought for us to have the precious right for us to vote for us to sit back and timidly allow our franchise to be taken away or diminished. we must not rest until the congress of the united states restores the voting rights acted protections discarded by a supreme court blind to the blatant theft of the black vote. paramount to martin luther king junior's fervent dream was the commitment that african-americans gained full economic opportunity and not be confined to basic mobility from a smaller ghetto to a larger one. today with 12% unemployment rates in the african-american community and 38% of all children of color in this country living below the level of poverty, we know the dream is far from being realized.
PBS
Aug 28, 2013 5:30pm PDT
was held to honor his dream. ezra brown is a saxophone player from the state of mississippi. he arrived in tokyo on august 28th to commemorate the historic day. the message he brought with him? let freedom ring. ♪ brown played a traditional spiritual song that he has been listening to since his childhood. it's a piece that people in the civil rights movement sang in church to help them during their struggle. >> in the words of dr. martin luther king jr., let's keep in our heart and our mind and our soul about universal peace, equality for everyone, freedom. ♪ >> well, it reminds me that i have to be conscious of the inequalities that does exist now in the world. >> i don't know how much longer it's going to take, if it's going to be another 50 years or what, but we still got a ways to go, you know, and we still got to kind of keep the march going. ♪ >>> a series of bombs have exploded in shia muslim areas in and around the iraqi capital baghdad. the blasts killed at least 40 people. another 160 were wounded. iraqi authorities say insurgents detonated bombs in 14 places including p
CSPAN
Aug 28, 2013 10:00am EDT
they were going to do some things that they previously would never have done. in texas and mississippi, north carolina and florida, groups are already devising creative ways to make it difficult for minorities, each of us, to vote. in texas, they have already done it. this assault on freedom should be taken as seriously as you have taken anything. any changes to our voting process should be enacted to make voices heard. just simply being able to vote. i have asked the senate judiciary committee to examine these dangerous voting suppression efforts and discuss steps the senate can make to preserve the right of every senatorto cast a ballot. leahy is doing that. [applause] on the day the civil rights act was signed into law, president lyndon johnson warned the struggle for equality was not nearly over. here is what he said. "those who founded our country knew that freedom would be secure only if each generation fought." now our generation of americans have been called on to the search of justice. he is sure right. those words are written -- are a reminder to a new generation that freedom
CSPAN
Aug 25, 2013 12:00am EDT
father and sister said we cannot rest and be satisfied as long as black folk in mississippi could not vote. and those in new york believed that they had nothing for which to vote. today the united states supreme court, having recently eviscerating the voting rights act and with numerous states clamoring to legislatively codify voting suppression measures, not only must we not be satisfied but we must fight back boldly. too many of our unknown heroes and sheroes fought, bled and died for us to have the precious rights of vote. for us to now sit back and timidly allow our franchise to be taken away or diminished, we must not rest until the congress of the united states restores the voting rights act protections discarded by a supreme court blind to the blatant tests of the black folks. paramount to martin luther king jr.'s fervent dream was the commitment that african americans gain full economic opportunity and not be confined to basic mobility forward from a smaller ghetto to a larger one. today, with 12% unemployment rates in the african american community and 38% of all children
CSPAN
Aug 28, 2013 12:00am EDT
on the south. i said, if we do not see meaningful progress, we will march through virginia, through mississippi and several other places. do your a member? >> i remember all that. i was donated to the march on washington committee and my task was distributing john's speech, the original speech to murmurs of the press who were seated down below lincoln, still above on the steps. i passed out these copies of john's speech and pointed out to them, that john would be the only speaker speaking that day who talk about black people instead of negroes or colored people as was the fashion. i thought and we thought that this demonstrated how militant we were and how different we were and better and superior we were from the other civil rights organizations. none of the reporters made any objection. [laughter] >> what did you mean by militant? >> i meant aggressive. nothing harmful or violent. i have always been upset by people who say, they are so militant. they equate it with violence. it is not necessarily equitable with violence. it just means somebody is it aggressively in pursuit of his ideas. we th
CW
Aug 19, 2013 12:00pm CDT
battered much of the southeast is again present flash floods and record rainfall. gulfport, mississippi got hit the worst receiving roughly 6 in. of rain. the rising rotor's covered roads, stalled cars and stranded drivers. the airport reportedly received more than 4.5 in. of rain in one hour. the heaviest rain has moved out and more showers are in the forecast. well for that reason for central idaho is now blocking more than 100,000 a.. lightning ignited the beaver creek fire almost two weeks ago. weather has helped firefighters but by last night it was only 5 percent contained. 2200 homes had been evacuated >> prison authorities examining information relating to the death of princess diana and her boyfriend. scotland yard is not saying what the information is, only that officers are assessing the relevance and credibility. the telegraph reports detectives were looking into claims princess diana was murdered by a member of the british military. the couple was killed and a high-speed crash in paris 16 years ago well, what he was chasing them. prince william set down for his first off
CSPAN
Aug 29, 2013 5:00pm EDT
, several other states said we made a big mistake. and mississippi had already done a better job than many and has now mandated its civil rights to be taught in all of the high schools in mississippi to read a great step forward for the state of mississippi which had -- north carolina has become the new mississippi now. so mississippi lost its place. i will let someone else answer the question. that is one of my students. a bright young man. >> i would just say it is the story itself at morehouse college for sure. we are going on line with some things and converging the expertise and the brain power. we have one of our professor. a couple things have happened in the country recently. the monument here in washington was about $120 million. and then the civil rights museum in atlanta. here is morehouse college that built a chapel in 1979 with a statute out front. we say that we need to convert more resources to really undergird this tradition at morehouse and that is what we are going to do. >> my name is jane and i had the honor of working at the brookings institution previously give it my
CSPAN
Aug 23, 2013 12:00pm EDT
every hill of mississippi and from every mountainside. let freedom ring, and when it happens, when we allow freedom to ring, when we let it ring from every village and from every state and every city we will be able to speed up the day that all of us black men and white men choose power and we will be able to join hands and sing in the old spirit of free at last, free at last. thank god almighty we are free at last. [applause] >> on a sunday morning in september of 1963, for young black girls attended sunday school at the 16th st. storch church. the bible lesson was a love that for dallas. the girl moved to the basement when suddenly an always went through the church like a cannon. the bomb planted near the basement went through the house of worship. they toppled a gruesome discovery. sandia, age 14, carroll robertson, age 14. addy mae colins and denise age 11 all were found dead, their bodies buried atop one another. >> it's great to be visible all through dallas. >> it will only be a matter of minutes before he arrives at the turnpike. >> they got in the newsroom and as perhaps you
CSPAN
Aug 28, 2013 2:00pm EDT
teenager on vacation in mississippi. is it is a new day, but the day isn't over. the struggle for the civil rights for civil rights, social justice, and economic opportunity to man our engagement and our voice. to realize fully our dream we must raise our voices and take action. we must lift our voices to challenge government and our community and neighbors to be better. we must lift our voices for wages that enable families to take care of themselves, for a health care system that erases disparities, for communities and homes without violence, for clean air and water to protect our environment for future generations, and for a just justice system. we must lift our voice for the value of our boat and have our votes counted without interference. as we stand here today, dr. king would know, and john lewis certainly knows, that today is not just a commemoration or celebration. it is a call to action for the work remains undone in the communities that remain unchanged. our foremothers and forefathers 50 years ago closed the books on the last century. well, when the book closes on the 21st centu
CSPAN
Aug 9, 2013 11:00pm EDT
to go south of richmond. just the way i was cultivated and mississippi was a scary place because emmitt till was murdered there. and i still remember ibm blacked and when we go together i wonder what people think and all day ever say is come back. i remember you from your service and never sure president. but i was a little gun shy with how i was brought up but we had a wonderful time. >> calling on the republican line. >> caller: with a race race, every time a black person kills a white person and it is o.k. but if a white person kills a black person they set out it is a race. it is not race all the time. we are past all that we need to except people who they are and quit complaining. >> guest: who is complaining? >> caller: the blacks always complain. >> guest: whitey think we're always explaining our circumstances? >> caller: they just complain get over the past. >> guest: you are from the south. you're from the south to the seveners get over the loss of the confederate war of the state's? >> caller: i am past that. the south lost. >> host: can you give us a little bit of your histor
CSPAN
Aug 3, 2013 8:00am EDT
down the mississippi filled with bales of hay for grant's horses. the barge set out at night, so the confederates wouldn't see it. but, unfortunately, it was a night with a full moon, and it was really quite visible, and the confederates fired cannons at it. one of the shells hit the barge, exploded, killed about a dozen union soldiers, set the hay on fire, and junius and albert jumped into the river and attempted to float away. but the confederates sut boats and captu th and imprisoned them in various prisons for the next 20 months. and then they escaped from a prison in salisbury, north carolina, and with the help of slaves and pro-union bush whackers walked 300 miles over the appalachians to the union lines. so i read this, which was only about as long as what i've just said, and i thought to myself, wow, that would make a great movie. unfortunately, i don't make movies. but occasionally i do write books. so i thought, well, should i write a book about these guys? i suppose if i was a novelist, that little synopsis would have been enough, and i just could have made up the rest
PBS
Aug 16, 2013 6:00pm PDT
. in wasn't mississippi. it was not too-- it was a different kind of state. this is punitive. it's vindictive. it's vengeful. it's just a way-- there is no evidence of any voter fraud of anybody using somebody else's identification to vote. if there were, you could say it's an over-reaction. this is a created fabrication to basically discourage, if not make impossible, voting by groups, people who belong to groups who don't ordinarily vote republican, who vote democratic. 56% of the people in north carolina voted on election day. early voting rather. there will be no early voting. it's just an attempt to make it difficult to vote. >> i guess i sort of agree. i would say two things. first, one of the great stories in american history and in the south in the last couple of years, couple of decades, is the gradual empowerment and franchisement of african americans. i think one's basic attitude is you don't want to be on the wrong side of that story. so i do think if you're supporting this, you're putting yourself on the wrong side of that story. having said that, do i think it's a h
CSPAN
Aug 28, 2013 11:00pm EDT
office is located in jackson mississippi. i have been with a head start since 1988 and i am excited to be here today to share some of our concerns about sequestration . >> i'm the associate director for education income maintenance of labor, part of the executive office of the president. we oversee the budgets of a number of federal agencies including education and the administration for children family. >> and the director of policy and planning. i started my 20 years ago. i'm really happy to be it today. >> was president budgets, policy, and economic cover tentative. i worked for secretary sibila is set the department of health and human services. >> i'm the managing director for economic policy here at the center for american progress. deficits and debt. >> was wondering if we could start with you. we heard numbers mentioned in the introduction. i wonder he might drill down on the more. the office has some additional information. maybe even what we might be seeing if sequestration continues. >> let me start. our topline numbers of children now. that's about 6,000 infants and todd
FOX
Aug 19, 2013 10:00pm EDT
in mississippi. >> guyot: people talked about his being from mississippi, being poor. >> his mother was a teenaged bride. they picked cotton, they worked the land. that's a hard living. >> barry: and i grew up dirt, dirt, dirt, dirt poor. did all kind of odd jobs, you know, hustling pop bottles. back in the day you could get old rags and sell them too. >> guyot: people talked about his lifting himself up by his bootstraps and... >> reporter: you were an eagle scout, you were a member of the national honor society, you played varsity basketball, you received a masters in chemistry, you were on your way to a doctorate and then you shifted gears. >> barry: i think that movement was the catalyst and the lightning rod for the country, and i'm proud to have been a part of it. >> guyot: his civil rights work resonated with people that a lot of other things wouldn't have resonated with. >> johnson: he had instant credibility. as well he should have. >> effi: i don't know if i should say it, but we were living together, i said, "well, what are we going to do? i mean, you know, you can't be l
CSPAN
Aug 17, 2013 12:00pm EDT
lifted from the mississippi delta, 1930s, you know, who lived there? well, as i was driving, you looked closer, there was puffs of smoke coming from the roof. it was not someone who lived there. someone was still living here in the year 2002, 2003. one day, myself and matt black, a photographer who, you know, is kind of a modern day dorothy lang, evans, we pulledded off the side of the road, came over the railroad tracks across this little dirt road here, across from this vineyard, and we pulled up to the shack. it was in better shape then, but a tarp paper shack, and as we walked up, there were rabbit furs that had been -- that were hammered on to the wall. i remember knocking once, twice, and this place was on stilts. the door creeked open, and there stood this black man who looked like he'd been lifted from the mississippi delta, 1930s. he had a stutter. in fact, later he told us that he came west with a stutter, one state at a time. his name was james dixon, 95, he was living here and had since the 40s. he was part of the migration of blacks who did something that no blacks in ameri
Al Jazeera America
Aug 30, 2013 9:00pm EDT
, mississippi, alabama, or in iowa along the river or other places in the midwest, we don't ask, you know, why would you want to rebuild that? we stand up for other americans. and new jersey is a donor state. we get 62 cents back for every dollar we send to the federal government. >> that was "america tonight's" adam may with new jersey's most famous resident, almost a year after hurricane sandy, governor chris christie says they must rebuild but at what cost? we will have that story next week. >>> and still to come, a real life ironman suit that's changing lives one step at a time. >>> finally tonight, technology. for most of us, that means the latest app on a smartphone, but sometimes a piece of hardware can profoundly change lives. >> it's a bionic robot called xcel, a battery powered external skeleton that give her legs the power to do this. >> are you ready? >> three, two, one... >> blastoff! >> and this. >> i'm walking, you guys! >> and even this. >> thank you. >> the technology is so cutting edge, that amanda is the first person in the united states to own one. >> the moment she stood u
NBC
Aug 2, 2013 6:00pm PDT
400,000 people expected. one of the largest, two-day street festivals west of the mississippi. it's a can't-miss event. and the best part, it's absolutely free. so there's a lot of things happening out there. a lot of different venues. over 700 booths you can visit. but the gourmet marketplace, that's denise with whole foods, this looks amazing. what is whole foods going to be doing? >> whole foods is going to be demoing every how on the hour. this is just a small sampling of some of the great food we're going to have. >> we're going to have great fried foods, but this is eye opening folks how easy it is to koom healthy. >> it is. and today we're going to make a very simple salad. four basic ingredients. >> i can do that. so let's go ahead and get to it. >> what is it called. >> it's a massage kale salad. all we're going to do is add one avocado. >> delicious. all local produce? >> all local produce. the juice of one lemon, some onions, a little pinch of salt, pepper. now the fun begins. >> the massage? >> we're going to massage the heck out of it. >> you're getting right in there
CSPAN
Aug 17, 2013 11:00pm EDT
as "operation plunder dome" and plead by an fbi agent named dennis who was originally from mississippi. and he lead the investigation that ultimately resulted in buddy's conviction. after a trial people said you'll never be able to convict buddy. in a city buddy went to prison with 67% of the voters thinking he did a good job even though they thought he was guilty. when he was sentenced, the judge talked about how he was two people. he was dr. jekyll and mr. hyde app and buddy said privately to a friend later, how come i didn't get two fing paycheck. what he was kicked of racketeering and conspiracy being kind of knowing about it but not actually being physically involved in the underlying act. and buddy kind of framed it as what did i do and i was convicted of being the mayor. some of the jurors i spoke to felt otherwise that he was a guy who knew how to keep himself insulated like a mob boss he once prosecuted, ironically. and that was able to stay out of the direct line, but that he knew everything that was going on. he was the kind of guy one juror told me who know how many rolls of toilet
PBS
Aug 19, 2013 3:00pm PDT
some time with senator eastland from mississippi and ted kennedy said dick russell. the fact is, you were within your own party caucus how to deal with people with whom you fundamentally disagree and that -in turn was great preparation -for the larger senate and indeed the larger body politics. that's gone. we now have a rigidly conservative and rigidly liberal party. >> what about you look a lot at -political engent and civic action right. how has that changed and how -does that fit into the kind strife that we're talking about here in washington. table, as they would say in the senate my friends here, my distinguished friends and colleagues. that if we want to make sense of what's happening now the moment to look back to when a lot of these things against change is the 60's and 70's, and this was a moment when many people on the right and on the left looked at what they would have described as the washington establishment and said this isn't responsive enough to the people. and they thought there were a number of ways
PBS
Aug 26, 2013 6:00pm PDT
. you saw selma in the 1965 voting rights act. you saw the mississippi summer project in the 1964 civil rights bill. you saw affirmative action, you saw all of these things grow out of that. you saw an effort to empower marginalize eed people across te country. we used the model we were using in terms of organizing and sex-determination pulling people together so they could take control of their own lives. those models were actually both things that grew out of the movement. washington is one of those epic points that there are a number of other epic points that actually pulled this whole process together. i think it's important to understand that even on the struggles on the march on washington, get the message out. >>ifill: we are still having big national conversations as they say about race, still coming out of the trayvon martin episode. and i wonder as you look back we wonder whether it's leadership that's missing, whether we're just not honest as a people in discussing these issues or whether we've come much further than they give us credit for? >> i think we have come a long way
NBC
Aug 12, 2013 4:00pm EDT
? >> gulf coast t states. katie: ready. >> louisiana. katie: >> mississippi. alabama. florida. texas. >> boom. katie: nice job. hat is your next category? katie: i think you should do the kardashians. you guys have to name the kardashian kids as well as the name of their mother. are you ready for that? >> kris. katie: ok. >> kourtney. katie: nice job. >> kim. kim. kim. katie: yes. >> khloe. >> rob. katie: nice. nice. nice. >> who can't talk english. >> troy, that is embarrassing. that is embarrassing. >> i couldn't have got that for $10 million. katie: well played, 9-7 the swamp people" win. nice. very, very nice. >> all thanks to the kardashians. all right. nice job. thank you guys. you were great. when we come back why the rural reality phenomenon has exploded and the very latest on your favorite shows from honey boo boo [ male announcer ] yoknow what's so awesome ababout the internet? it gets more and more entertaining every day. and once you've got verizon fios, that's when you get it -- how 100% fiber optics takes your entertainment to ridiculous levels. i was streaming videos,
CSPAN
Aug 9, 2013 7:00am EDT
it was just the way i was cultivated -- i don't know, it was just the way i was cultivated. mississippi was always a scary place because emmett till was murdered there. , when i go south i still remember that i am black, and i wonder if people will see anything, and all they ever say -- all they ever say is, "y'all come back, you hear," or "we wish you were president, bill." it always stuns me. i'm gun shy because of how i was brought up. but we had a wonderful time in west virginia. michael in alabama is calling on our republican line. hello, i would like to say about race, you know, every time a black person kills a white person, it's ok, but if a white person kills a black person, they set out to do it as a race thing. it's not a race thing all the time. we are past all that now. we need to learn to love each other and accept people for who complaining -- guest: who was complaining? well, i mean, the blacks always complain -- why don't you think we are explaining our circumstances? caller: well, they just complain -- you know, get over what happened in the past. south.you are from th
NBC
Aug 19, 2013 7:00am PDT
is alive this morning. we say hey y'all. fine folks from mississippi. >> tupelo, mississippi. >> home of elvis presley. thanks for being here this morning. let's show what you can expect today. wilmington, north carolina, hello to everyone watching us this morning, wect. watch for scattered thunderstorms today and temperature right around 85 degrees. it is the same old story for us in the southeast. more showers and storms, including the carolinas, up to the virginias. the rest of the country, primarily dry. hot, especially in the west. exacerbating the fire issues out there. forecast, stalled front across the southeast, more showers and storms. looking beautiful >>> hey, thanks, mike. good morning to you. 8:07. back to work monday. this is san francisco where you can see that compressed marine layer. let's show you what it looks like now on the golden gate bridge where you can hardly see anything at all. please travel cautiously. 72 degrees in the city headed your way. elsewhere, we do have a chance for thunderstorms and we have a red flag warning in place for today, tomorrow, all th
CSPAN
Aug 23, 2013 6:00am EDT
the context here and the whole climate was set. jim was in jail than mississippi. the sheriff's told the black inmates either beat her or we will be to you. so they beat her unconscious. so there were 200 demonstrations of the country that day and people going to jail. the public accommodations bill, the dream was the right to vote. the dream of 66 was in chicago for housing. the treen at 67 was the poor people's campaign to end the war mike in vietnam. dr. king made the case from 32% down to 12 on the lyndon johnson war on poverty. by the way, our hearts were trained with pain johnson had no background on civil rights. only the civil rights legislator in the history of the country and passed with lyndon johnson and 64 kuhl of the voting rights act of 65, daycare, child-care, speeding programs, appellations, the regional council, all of that is lbj. the record matches are lyndon baines johnson. the speech is always around. from the last staff meeting it went something like this. i had a migraine headache for nine days and maybe my time is up. maybe i've done as much as i could do. maybe i shou
CSPAN
Aug 9, 2013 2:00pm EDT
was cultivated. mississippi was always a scary --ace because emmett till was because emmett till was murdered there. and yet, when i go south i still remember that i am black, and i wonder if people will see anything, and all they ever say is, "y'all come back, you hear," or "we wish you were president, bill." it always stuns me. i'm gun shy because of how i was brought up. but we had a wonderful time in west virginia. host: michael in alabama is calling on our republican line. caller: yeah, hello, i would like to say about race, you know, every time a black person kills a white person, it's ok, but if a white person kills a black person, they set out to do it as a race thing. it's not a race thing all the time. we are past all that now. we need to learn to love each other and accept people for who they are in good complaining -- -- quit and planning. guest: who was complaining? caller: well, i mean, the blacks always complain -- guest: why don't you think we are explaining our circumstances? caller: well, they just complain you know, get over what happened in the past. guest: you are from th
PBS
Aug 19, 2013 6:00pm PDT
some time with senator eastland fromto mississippi and ted kennedy said dick russell. dithe fact is, you learned within your own party caucus how to deal with people with whom you fundamentally disagreed, and that in turn was great preparation for the larger senate and indeed the larger body politics. th that's gone. we now have a rigidly -conservative and rigidly liberal party. >> what about you look a lot at political engagement and civic actionht. how did that change and how does -does that fit into the kind of -that we're talking about here in washington. we're talking about here in washington. here atable, as they wouldble, as they w say in the senate, my friends here my distinguished friends and colleagues. i think they're absolutely righto make s that we want to make sense of -what's happening now the moment to look back to when a lot of these things against change ise is the 60's and 70's and that was a moment when many people on the right and on the left looked at what they would have described as the washington establ
CBS
Aug 23, 2013 7:00am EDT
that will swim up, they have been known to swim up to mississippi river. most say it is the mouth of the bay. one thing you don't need to be concerned is getting attacked by a shark in chesapeake bay. there are parts of the world, chesapeake bay, they are uncommon there >> reporter: you don't need to worry about going in the bay? >> with the frequency, number of bull sharks going on, very infrequent, not going to be a problem. >> reporter: were you surprised? >> it happened in 2001. couple of fisherman, caught them, turned up at the mouth of the potomac. typically a couple every year. this is something going on. chesapeake bay is a highway of fish coming in from the ocean. they are there for food just like these sharks are coming for food. they are full of stipe bass. >> reporter: they are not hunting people? >> they are looking for fish. >> reporter: if you see one, what should you do? >> if you are at the beach and see a large shark, it would be in your best interest to go to the pool. >> reporter: i am with you. [laughter]. >> we have 16 species of sharks in the lower bay. bay is important for
NBC
Aug 9, 2013 9:00am EDT
mississippi river valley. sunny and hot in the pacific northwest. heat continues in the southwest. sunday, sunday, a gorgeous day from the great lakes into new england. more wet weather, though, mid-atlantic state down into the southeast. atlanta is over 200% of the rain it should have for this time of the year. we're also looking at a lot of >> good morning. there is a chance for some light rain showers to start today. some scattered strong thunderstorms will develop this afternoon. >>> that's your latest weather. >>> thanks. every day there is a new health study out. everything from cutting your cancer risk with with garlic to why youight not be get a good night's sleep. >> here to break down the biggest headlines in health are here and adam the director of gynecology in connecticut. good to see you. >> good to see you. >> first, we have been talking about this one, first out of canada, a study showed 30 to 40% of couples are sleeping apart. >> that's right. i don't think it's just in canada. the u.s. surveys have this as well. but the good news is it's not necessarily a bad thing. slee
Current
Aug 1, 2013 6:00am PDT
. but across the states of florida, alabama, mississippi, louisiana, and texas, maybe not. >> we're going to stop you for not having a gun. [ laughter ] >> stephanie: there you go. exactly. yeah, i guess that's -- you know, that's a state by state issue, chris. >> it is. >> stephanie: killed an unarmed teenager -- all right. okay. daryle in mobile -- >> caller: [ inaudible ] mobile, stephfy. >> stephanie: hi daryle go ahead. >> caller: i was doing 80 and a black guy got ahead of me speeding, and i got pulled over, and i had my police t-shirt on, and i had my weapon on my side. he said okay. i need your license and registration. but he did give me a ticket. >> stephanie: yikes. yeah, interesting. interesting. i guess you are not quite as awesome as george zimmerman. >> caller: i guess not. when i seen that on the news. i said, wow, what a break. >> stephanie: yeah, you are not quite as white looking as george zimmerman. maybe that's what it is. >> wow. >> stephanie: just yet another incredible story, how about incredible that awesome -- >> he's so awesome. >> stephanie: right. he is just g
NBC
Aug 6, 2013 7:00am PDT
as well. a slight risk of strong storms into the central and upper mississippi river valleys. beautiful weather up in the west coast. 89 >>> 7:36. good tuesday morning to you. meteorologist christina loren. this is san jose. we have the same dark sky just about everywhere. overcast conditions for the first part of the day. we'll see a nice sunny finish. temperatures stay comfortable. 79 degrees on the way to livermore, 80 in fairfield, 77 concord and 74 degrees in beautiful redwood city for today. holding steady through thursday, then we'll crank the heat up come this weekend. hope you have a fantastic day. >>> don't forget any time you need that weather go to the weather channel or weather.com online, savannah. >>> all right. al, thank you so much. this morning on rossen reports, the summer months are peek moving season and some rogue companies are looking to take advantage of it. jeff rossen is on the case. good morning to you. >> we are here to help. a lot of us move. 35 million americans a year and when you hire a moving company you trust them with everything but authorities say com
ABC
Aug 16, 2013 7:00am PDT
start to the weekend. jackson, mississippi, 87. little rock, 82. orlando will end up around 90. again, showers >>> good morning. i'm mike nicco. going to be slightly cooler today everywhere. the cooling trend continues tomorrow. but then look at sunday. the sea breeze >> listen, we love, love macklemore. but we had so many great concerts right here in the park. and all of them because of famous footwear. and we have something special. under here, we picked three audience members. they're going to help me out. famous footwear and "gma" have bought a lot of shoes. brand-new shoes for kids that need them. they'll go to the salvation army. and the game we're going to play is guess how many pair of shoes on here. if you win, you get a $100 gift card. i want you to write down your numbers. have an idea. oh, the top, too. there's a lot more shoes under here. there it is. okay. do you have your guesses? and your names are ashley, dahlia and anu, i believe. they're taking their time. on three, one, two, three, show me. all right. 133, the actual number. you win the $100 gift card to famous foo
MSNBC
Aug 18, 2013 7:00am PDT
of the lynching of emmitt till in mississippi. the official name of the march was march on washington for freedom. it was to call out the economic inequality and social restrictions faced by black americans in the south and in the north. it was also not dr. king's march. he was one of several speakers scheduled to be on the dais that day. the speech that martin luther king, jr. planned to deliver that day was not his dream for america. it was an accuse jays. king's speech accused the country and its leaders of handing the negro a bad check. on economic advancement, access to public spaces, education and jobs. it was only when king went off script that he spoke of his dream and gave the world the lines that have come to define him in history. after the march, king, randolph and the other leaders gathered at the white house. and kennedy reportedly lined into king and smiled saying, i have a dream. three months later kennedy was did. the following july the civil rights bill that 250,000 people marched for was passed. when we commemorate the march on washington next weekend it will be that dream and
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